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Intro to Research Writing

(with a focus on creating a large project)

 

Instructor: Fish W.W. Burton

Email: fishb@uvu.edu

Section 071
Time:
Monday and Wednesday 13:00 – 14:15
Location: ME 106

Section 074
Time: 
 Monday and Wednesday 16:00 – 17:15
Location: LA 230

Section 605
Time:
Monday and Wednesday 17:30 – 18:45
Location: CB 202

 
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Course Description: English 2010 emphasizes academic inquiry and research in the humanities and social sciences. The course explores issues from multiple perspectives; teaches careful reasoning, argumentation, and rhetorical awareness of purpose, audience, and genre; focuses on critically evaluating, effectively integrating, and properly documenting sources; and, in addition to major essay assignments, may include in-class writing and collaboration, an annotated bibliography, oral presentations, and portfolios.

Course Outcomes: By the end of the course students should be able to identify the audience, purpose, and genre in research-focused writing projects; demonstrate use(s) of reading and writing for inquiry; evaluate and integrate source materials into writing projects; apply knowledge of college-level, academic writing and research. Students should be able to use the elements of argument in an exemplary manner; distinguish between types of evidence and understand their appeal to different audiences; understand how genres shape reading and writing. Students should be able to understand a research assignment as a series of tasks, including research questions, conducting preliminary research to refine the thesis, collecting, evaluating, analyzing and synthesizing appropriate research data and sources; represent fairly and refute and/or concede to opposing arguments; understand the value of of peer collaboration and the social aspects of writing processes; use multiple drafts and revise successful texts; consistently apply flexible generating, revising, and proofreading strategies; document their work in an exemplary manner and produce paper manuscripts in MLA style; and produce work free of editing errors.

 
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Attendance: My policy is this: you are adults. When you signed up for college, you paid (are paying) for it, and if you want to be absent from class, then that is on you to waste (or spend) your money how you like (I haven't done the math, but you might want to figure out (based on tuition and a multitude of other things you are paying for (rent, food, etc.)) how much you are paying for each class period, and how much you are losing each time you decide to skip class). At any rate, I also believe in natural consequences. If you miss class, you will miss the crucial information and discussions that really can't be replicated and are provided in order to help you accomplish the learning tasks of the class. You can use electronics as much as you need in the class, but if you use them so much that you aren't paying attention, then you are functionally absent, and all the things I have said above about being absent applies in this case as well. You do get points for doing the in-class freewrites (more on that below), and this is how I take role (so, if you miss class, you will miss those points, and they add up). I give those points generously, and understand if you have to miss class occasionally. If I see that you are turning in your freewrites and are not present, I will be irked and probably remove additional freewrite points for being dishonest. For the most part, I leave your attendance up to your discretion.

Communication: I prefer messages on Canvas, but you can communicate with me via email or Canvas. I will try to respond within 48 hours. You will receive all the comments I make on your assignments through Canvas. If you email me with private questions, I will assume that your email is private enough to be in line with any student federal privacy regulations (such as FERPA). If this is not the case, please let me know so I can respect you and your privacy, and so we can find a secure means of communication. If you have any issues with the class, please speak to me. I promise that I want to change and will listen to any feedback that you have. I want to be a respectful, helpful, kind (is this starting to sound like the Boy Scout motto?), and courteous teacher. I will communicate with the class through Canvas. Sometimes I may need to cancel class (rarely) or clarify an assignment or update you on more immediate changes to the syllabus (occasionally), so if you want to keep up to date on the class, make sure you have the Canvas app or have email updates activated or check Canvas before coming to class.

Etiquette: Don't be a jerk. Also, I don't care if you use electronics in class; in fact, I encourage it, because there are so many resources that can help you through and with learning, and our electronics are such a part of our diurnal discussions that it would be silly for me to try and stop you. Of course, if you use them as a distraction, then you are, as far as I see it, just throwing your college money in the trash, and I’m not going to stop you from doing that either. Also, I don’t care if you eat food in class. In fact, I’ve always fantasized (yes, this is a confession) that students will suddenly rebel against the system and organize their own food schedule (despite, and without approval from, the instructor) because they want to learn and learn comfortably (i.e. gnoshing on foods and snacks of great variety and refinement)), but this is just a fantasy (fantasy: imagining things that are impossible or, at best, improbable (yes, I am challenging you)).

Content: Being in college (being human) means you will have to deal with some heavy/tough stuff. If any objectionable content is presented in class, you are welcome (even encouraged) to express yourself in class or with me privately. That all said, I will be as conscious and respectful as I can.

Style: Since all of your final assignments will be turned in on Tumblr, I want to mention that you should adopt the style, the documentation and the citation practices of the platform. In all other ways you should default to the Chicago Manual of Style (chicagomanualofstyle.org) or MLA Style (owl.purdue.com). In other words, please, whatever you do, don’t make your assignments on Tumblr look like assignments for a class. Don't title them "Best Piece of Writing" or "Rhetorical Analysis." Those are bad titles in any place, and people won't read your blogs if you title them like that (and don't worry about me knowing which assignment is which; if you turn them in on Canvas in the right way, then I will know exactly which assignment it is). Also, I would recommend looking into unsplash.com; it’s a great resource for free high-resolution photos that you can use in your Tumblr blogs and major assignments.

Audience: There are a lot of things that I can’t teach you, only because these learning experiences come by way of sociality and serendipity. In order to encourage pedagogical serendipity, I want you to create an audience on Tumblr. I want you to write everything you write to that audience, or at least try to find them as you write. An audience is not a given, you have to imagine it and then do what you can to appeal to it.

Topics: Over the years of teaching this course, I have come to realize that students have difficulty in believing me when I say they can pick their own texts, topics, media and substrates for the respective major assignments. I really mean it (and I honestly enjoy the risk-takers; I reward those who take thoughtful and intentional risks). If you want to write a rhetorical analysis on mountains (mountains as “text”), by all means, please. If you want to write a discourse community essay on permaculture (permaculture as “topic”), then you can. In the first few days of the course, we will talk about literacy, language, etc. These discussions will help you expand your view of what “texts,” “topics,” “media” and “substrates” are. I would encourage you to picks texts that will benefit you, and ones that you want to gain literacy in. For example, if you are a finance major, then I would recommend picking finance texts. If you are studying microbiomes, then pick texts that are or have to do with microbiomes. These assignments are not only there to teach you the basic principles of rhetoric and writing, but can also benefit you by teaching you the basic principles of rhetoric and writing within your own chosen field. I will caution against getting too abstract with the idea of “texts” in this class, only because the base assumption I have of students in this class is that they are beginning. Again, you can take the idea of “texts” to their limits, but there are reasons that only the most seasoned poets peer over the ledges, bushes or buildings.  At other times, students will struggle picking a text from the great many texts out there (there are, so many great ones to pick from; and I, myself, suffer from FOBO at times (fear of better options)). My suggestion here is to think on what you enjoy right now. Don’t get too far-sighted; take pleasure in what is close to you at the current moment.

Assignments: All of the major assignments are required: Project Proposal, Annotated Bibliography, Opinion Series, Research Project, and the Portfolio Epilogue. If you don’t complete them, then the department requires me to automatically fail you; just a heads up. Below you should find thorough descriptions of the assignments. If you need additional clarification, the beginning of each class is a good opportunity to ask for that clarification.

Deadlines: I’m not going to deduct points if you turn in things late. In other words, there are only suggested deadlines, but there are no hard deadlines (but you should convince yourself that there actually are deadlines, and if you can’t do that then tell yourself there are “deadlines” (but then learn how to treat things in scare-quotes seriously (I don’t care how you learn how to believe things (actually, no, i’m fascinated by that)))), and you can turn assignments in whenever you like. But there is such a thing as assignments stacking up so much that you never recover and ultimately fail the class because you've left yourself with too much to chew on and too little time to swallow or digest (let alone write). And since there are no deadlines, there are, I suppose, no lifelines either (you can turn in an assignment early (though why get ahead of the lectures unless you plan on implementing what you learn after the fact (in which case i personally wouldn't do it early)). In other words, if you do something early, you will miss out on the opportunity to implement what you are learning in class. I have a schedule with suggested deadlines. If you stick to those suggested deadlines, then you will do great. If you don't, then I don't know how you will do. But, again, the core assignments must be completed or I have to fail you.

Submissions: All your assignments will be submitted on Canvas. When you click on an assignment you will be given two options: one, paste some text; or, two, submit a link. If it asks you to submit a link, this will be a link to your Tumblr account or one of your Tumblr blogs. The assignment descriptions on this syllabus (below) should make it clear on how to submit the assignment. If you submit any assignments in the wrong way, then I will ask you to revise and resubmit the assignment.

Resubmissions: I do allow students to resubmit their papers if they are not happy with the grade I have given them the first round. If you do resubmit your paper, I only ask that you include with the resubmission some notes on the changes that you made (i.e. a thorough paragraph that explains and details the changes). Obviously, I cannot let you resubmit papers after the final day for assignments, so if you intend on utilizing this convenience, then I suggest turning your papers in earlier as opposed to later.

Feedback: As the semester comes to a close, I am buried in papers, and suddenly everyone wants feedback on all of their papers all at once. This is one unfortunate setback to how I’ve set up the class, and so I say that I will give limited feedback during the last section of the class (i.e. I probably won’t give you feedback during the last section of the semester at all). If you want feedback on papers, do them earlier rather than later.

Drafts: I give you points for doing drafting for the five main assignments. You may not be used to this approach (most students binge write (I know, mostly, because that’s what I did as an undergraduate, and because students always make that confession at the end of the semester)), but I want you to try drafting out. Again, if you can convince me that you don’t need to do this, or that you know better, or have found a better way, then please dialogue with me. I am open to better suggestions, and if you happen to find a better way to structure the course, then I will completely re-structure my course, because I want to do what is best for students of writing. Also, I don't give comments on drafts unless you ask me specific questions. If you don’t understand the paper, you have no one to blame but yourself, only because I give my students ample lectures and many opportunities to ask questions (at the beginning of every class period), and if you miss class and neglect to ask questions, then there is not much I can do to help you.  

Grading: Please write for people, not for a grade. I will try to grade you as best as I can (yes, grading is subjective, but most things are (I honestly have yet to meet someone who successfully leaves the body into a true objective essence that pervades the universe, but if you know, personally, anyone like this, then please let me know). I’ll just say this: I am more concerned with your effort than your performance (though performance necessarily seems to be a part of performance). If you come to class, participate, practice what we discuss, and work hard on your final papers, then you will do great in the class. Also, I sort of despise people who care more about their grades than they do their learning (although I understand how our school system encourages this kind of mentality). You will get a better grade in my class if you focus on learning and improving your writing skills. That's what you are paying for, and it is rather odd that I have to train people to get what they are paying for. Also, if you feel that you were given an unfair grade, then you are always welcome to challenge the grade in an academic manner (or explain yourself, or tell me why you believe that I gave the wrong grade). To be clear, I give you the option of doing this in order to enter into an academic conversation with me, not as a means to allow for fighting or responding with ire. And make sure that you look at the comments as well as the score; you won’t improve unless you look at what mistakes were made and determine to change them.

Grades: You are responsible for your grades. Make sure you spend the time to understand what is worth what and how it will effect your overall grade. If you decide not to do an assignment, and then tell me later you are disappointed with your grade, I will tell likely (and rhetorically) ask you why you didn’t complete the assignment. Also, If you ask me what your grade is, I will just point you to Canvas where all your grades are. If there are grades missing, then I haven't graded them, and I can't tell you what your grade is on assignments I haven't yet graded (although you are always welcome to prompt me to grade something if you are wanting feedback in a timelier manner). My assignments all add up to a thousand points, nothing is weighted, there are no curve balls, so I've made the math simple for you (and me).

Workshops: There will be days in which the class will magically, by the power of my voice and authority, change from a lecture hall into a workshop. On these days I expect you to be there so I can watch you closely as you work and prod you with questions and hopefully arouse some sort of courage (or fear (whichever is more useful)) in you. (Does this all sound like a rather miserable experience) I’ve been known to cause students to pursue their wildest dreams and confront some of their greatest fears and setbacks in life (I sometimes can’t help but see writers’ blocks as life blocks). But these days are also useful for the fact that there will be a whole class engaged in their writing projects, and I can’t iterate to you how vital and helpful these days are, if only you get to talk to another student who is struggling with the same thing you are (commiseration is sometimes the hot-bed of collaboration and innovation). I also recommend using these days to work on the most difficult things in this class, mostly because I will be there as a resource to help you work out those struggles or writing blocks as they arise.

Makeup: I inevitably have students ask me how they can make up work, either because they've planned something else or because they didn't expect something else to happen. Because I am easier on class attendance, I will be more reticent with makeup (I’ve decided to draw the line of absences and makeup different than most teachers). If you have a university excused absence, then I will help you catch up. If you just miss class, I will not hold private lessons for you to personally catch up. Again, you are paying for my expertise at a specifically scheduled time that we all mutually signed up for. I hope you will understand—early—that my classes are not lectures that can just be read or understood at your leisure (with some powerpoint, handout or another). I don't teach like that, so if you miss class you miss something that can't be replicated.

 
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Canvas ( uvu.instructure.com ): This is the platform that you will be using to turn in your freewrites, drafts, and the links to your final assignments (after you have blogged them on Tumblr). I recommend that you download the app on your devices. You should already have an account created for you by the university. If you try going to Canvas through canvas.com or something like that, then you will likely get confused, so just stick with the link at the beginning of this paragraph. You can send me messages on this platform, and you can turn in assignments under the assignments section.

Tumblr ( tumblr.com ): This is the platform that you will be using to turn in your final drafts and your out-of-class tumblr blogs and out-of-class reblogs. At the beginning of the semester, you will create an account (if you don't already have one). Also, I have so many students ask (for whatever reason) how I will know if they have done the blogs and reblogs assignment. Don’t worry about me finding you. I have you turn in your assignments as links, so it’s rather easy to find them (I just need to click). I would also recommend getting to know the platform and how it works: “About Tumblr.” I recommend downloading this app as well. It will make it easy to write blogs and make reblogs while you are waiting in the various lines that modern society has provided with us (can you imagine our neanderthal ancestors waiting in line?).

 
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Reading: Do the reading for my class before you do the reading for any other classes (every college professor says this, or at least wants to say this, by the way). I recognize that reading for a class is difficult, so let me tell you my thoughts on why I encourage you to do the reading before each class (and why I ultimately assign these readings). They are there to help prepare you for the discussions. If you don’t do the reading, then the conversations in class won’t benefit you in the same way, or, at the very least, you won’t have an example or text to draw from or base our theoretical discussions on. The readings from the mindful writing book are intended as supplemental reading, but I do hope that what you learn and take from these readings will add to your ability to participate in the discussions, and add to your curiosity toward investigating the variety of terms and ideas we visit throughout the semester.

Print Reading:
Everyone’s an Author, 2nd Edition / ISBN: 9780393265293 

Digital Reading:
Tumblr

Referential Reading:
Structure, Sign and Play by Jacque Derrida
Beowulf by an Anglo-Saxon
A Sign in Space by Italo Calvino
The World of Wrestling by Roland Barthes
The Typography of Stranger Things by Sarah Gless
The Good, Racist People by Ta-Nehisi Coates
I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King Jr.
Why I Am Teaching a Course Called "Wasting Time on the Internet" by Kenneth Goldsmith
Why Were Confederate Monuments Built? by Miles Park
The Philosophy of Bill Murray by Wisecrack
Joyas Voladoras by Brian Doyle
Leap by Brian Doyle
Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin
Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace
A Walk in the Pink Moccasins by Carol Lynn Pearson
A Plea for Captain John Brown by Henry David Throreau
Resistance to Civil Government by Henry David Throreau
Let Justice Roll Down by Martin Luther King Jr.
White Debt by Eula Biss
The Case for Reparations by Ta-Nehisi Coates
Objectified by Gary Hustwit
Popcorn Explosion with Mr Let’s Paint by Mr Let’s Paint
Let’s Paint, Bicycle & Blend TV by Mr Let’s Paint
The Death of the Author by Roland Barthes
“For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.” by Farhad Manjoo
Xenotext by Christian Bök
Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote by Jorge Luis Borges
Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction by Roland Barthes
Postmodern Essay Generator by Elsewhere
Tender Buttons by Gertrude Stein
Minister Farrakhan
The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows by John Koenig

Visual Reading:
The Treachery of Images by Rene Magritte
One and Three Chairs by Joseph Kosuth
From “DRIFT” by Caroline Bergvall
Cremation Project by John Baldesari
Fur-Lined Teacup by Meret Oppenheim
Obey by Shepherd Fairey 
The Artist Is Present by Marina Abramovic
The Fountain by Marcel Duchamp
The Next Rembrandt by Ing
Untitled (Chalkboard) by Cy Twombly
Chair by David Hockney
Shark Bites the Internet

Student Hall of Fame:
[coming soon]

 
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Best Writing (Preparatory assignment / 50 points / Any word count / Blogged on Tumblr then link submitted on Canvas): Find the best piece of writing that you have, blog it on Tumblr, and then submit the link on Canvas. Don’t blog it to Tumblr with the title “My Best Piece of Writing;” that is a boring title, and no one will read it (also, consider adding pictures to your articles; that will up your chances of getting readers (or so i hear)). I don’t care what it is, or how long it is, just as long as it contains language and you genuinely feel that it is your best piece of writing (so, yes, it can be a poem if you so choose). The only thing I don’t want from this assignment is for it to look like a school assignment. Try to make it look as much like a Tumblr article as you can. If you "have" nothing, then you need to write something as best as you can and then claim that as the best writing that you have. A note on the pedagogical reasons for this assignment: this is a diagnostic piece of writing that you and I will use to know what you're best is in order to help you become better than your best. I suppose you could cheat yourself by sending me something of lesser quality, but why would you want to cut your education short like that?

In-Class Freewrites (Ongoing assignment / 100 points / Any word count / Messaged on Canvas): At the beginning of class, you will write non-stop for a few minutes. There are two rules for this assignment. First, put the subject of the Canvas message as "freewrite" or "free write.” Please put this as the subject so I don’t confuse these with other messages you might be sending me. The second rule is “dont’ stop writing.” If you can’t think of anything to type besides “Taco Bell,” then just write that over and over again. And if you can’t even think of words, then just bang on the keyboard until you can think of words. Please don’t send me freewrites for days that you are not present, I will just delete them. These freewrites are important as an opportunity for play and experimentation. I want you to be as playful and experimental and crazy as you can get with language. Try misspelling everything. Try thinking faster than you are typing. Try typing with your elbows, etc., etc., etc.

Out-of-Class Blogs on Tumblr (Ongoing assignment / 100 points / 250 words minimum each / 25 blogs total / blogged on Tumblr and link submitted on Canvas): The way to submit this assignment is rather simple: copy the link to your Tumblr account and paste it in the respective assignment on Canvas. As far as accomplishing or doing the assignment, that will take a little more work. Before each class (or whenever you like, since there are only suggested deadlines) you should write an original Tumblr blog. You can write on whatever you like. I would recommend writing on something that you are interested or something associated with your major, but you can write on anything you like. These blogs are a good opportunity for you to practice and implement what you are learning in class. I have added numbers on the schedule (at the suggestion of a student) to help you know how to pace yourself. Again, there is no such thing as late work, but I advise against letting these stack up (which students inevitably do, and one student found out and told me there is a limit to how many you can blog in a day, so keep that in mind as well). If you think that these are busywork, then don’t do them. Instead, I want you to write to me why they are busywork and why you shouldn’t do them. If you convince me of this, then I won’t require you to do them. No, reblogging something doesn’t count as a blog. I want to see original content from you.

Out-of-Class Re-blogs on Tumblr (Ongoing assignment / 100 points / 100 words minimum each / 25 re-blogs total / blogged on Tumblr and link submitted on Canvas): The way to submit this assignment is rather simple: copy the link to your Tumblr account and paste it in the respective assignment on Canvas. Make sure you re-blog the blogs that you re-blog on, so I can easily find them at the end of the semester. As far as accomplishing or doing the assignment, before each class you should write a re-blog on a Tumblr article you have picked. There are a wide variety of topics (really, try typing in anything on Tumblr, and I bet you will find it (and if you don’t find it, well, then you have found something that needs to be written; so write it)). Try to write a meaningful re-blog instead of trying to write the most vanilla re-blog that adds nothing to the conversation. Try to add to the conversation. Try to take the good from the article and take it a little further. Try to be constructive and critical. I promise you that this is not busywork. I have been studying and teaching writing for a few years now; and if you will do this, then I promise it will surprise you (especially when someone messages you back after re-blogging on their article (and isn’t that scary and gratifying (and, oh, yeah, that’s what writing should be like and should have been like all along (funny how asking students to write in a world of people will help them realize how evocative and exciting the whole thing can be)))).

Freewrite Drafts (Unit assignments / 10 points each unit - Five units - 50 points total / About 250 words minimum / Submitted on Canvas): These are very loose ideas written down. I don't care what they say, how they are formatted, whether they are coherent, or really much of anything other than being evidence that you are actively thinking about your paper or project ahead of time. Think of this as something like brainstorming or jumping in the cold waters of the page. They should be typed. In terms of grading, I’m mostly looking to see if you have met the word count.

Rough Drafts (Unit assignments / 10 points each unit - Five units - 50 points total / Half the word count of the respective final draft / Submitted on Canvas): This should be the essay half finished. That can be half the word count or half the structure worked out, or half of anything, but it should have a steady amount of work done. In terms of grading, I look to see if the essay is in the right ball field, if its headed, generally, in the right direction.

Formal Drafts (Unit Assignments / 10 points each unit - Five units - 50 points total / Full word count of the respective final draft / Submitted on Canvas): At this point in the writing process, the essay should have all the parts but maybe not the polish. It should be mostly done, almost done, but not fully done. It should be ready to show people, or maybe at this stage you might take it to the Writing Center. In terms of grading, I am looking to see if all the pieces are there and make sure it’s taking on a developed structure.

Project Proposal Final Draft (Unit one / 1000 words / 100 points / Blogged on Tumblr then link submitted on Canvas): When your draft is finished, blog it to Tumblr, and then submit the link on Canvas. At this point, you should consider the essay finished (although I don't think anything could ever be finished (just ask Walt Whitman about his Leaves of Grass)). As far as grading goes, I am looking that you have put an appropriate amount of effort into the writing, that you have implemented the concepts and practices from the in-class discussions, and that you have followed the directions outlined in the respective assignment descriptions (which you will see below)I want you to write a formal narrative of your projected research plan. [a methodology for gathering data: how are you going to collect data on the south american bat?]logos / Propose a working thesis. Define the topic and present a strategy for a longer research paper. Summarize your topic of investigation. Outline and define key terms that you will use throughout the project and that will guide your research process. Ask important questions you'll need to find out through primary and secondary research. Set out plans for secondary and primary research in order to complete the task. What changes in direction are you open to? You’ll want to do some research, but this is not the focus of this section. Define your secondary research methods: What do you need to know and why is this important to know? What kinds of sources do you seek? What keywords or key phrases promise to be useful? Consider whether primary research is applicable. Include suggestions or plans for original or primary research. Name potential original research (interview, survey, eyewitness observation, exploring raw data). Who might you interview and why? What groups might you survey and why? Give a few sample questions for an interview or survey. What raw data (census data, or other sources with stores of information that you can interpret). What eyewitness observations might contribute to your knowledge? pathos / Try to make it sound like an interesting research project, which, if others read your proposal, would be taken up by someone else (after having read your proposal). Make the proposal seem so necessary that if you didn’t finish the project, someone else would. Create an enthusiasm for the project. Show your audience why this is an important and interesting and valuable thing to address. Pretend your audience is reluctant to pass off your idea and you have to convince them that this is a valuable thing for you to spend your time on. Use the rhetoric (that you’ve learned in other classes) to make a convincing argument for this project. Pretend that you are going to receive a grant or research money if your project sounds interesting and worthwhile. Treat the assignment like a grant proposal or a business loan proposal, like most or any proposal you have to show your audience that it is worthwhile, worth the time and effort to invest in. Make your audience an investor. (If you want a good example of this, the consider watching some episodes of Shark Tank on Youtube). A good paper will sell your audience on the idea, make them jealous, make them wonder why they hadn’t thought of doing that before. Make sure to include your vision for what the research can and will accomplish, what it will do to help the discourse move along. Avoid giving the impression that you have already solved the research question or problem, or coming across too strident in your initial claims or tentative thesis, as you want to display an open mind in the research phase of your project.ethos / Consider what you currently know and what you need to know about the topic area. The proposal shares your interests in a topic area. What is your role and purpose in addressing the topic. Why you? Why are you qualified? Provide ethos for why you, particularly, should address this. Write a justification for your inquiry. What business do you have researching this? Why are you qualified to write this? Describe your interest in the topic. What brought you to consider the topic? Share your enthusiasm or concern to garner audience interest.kairos / Provide a rationale as to why your project is significant. Why does the topic matter now and today? Introduce your audience by showing them why your topic is important and relevant to the discourse at large.resources / Starting Your Research, 445-454; Project Proposals, 356-360

Annotated Bibliography Final Draft (Unit Two / 250 words per source / 10 sources / 100 points / blogged on Tumblr then link submitted on Canvas): An annotated bibliography is a list of citations of books, articles, and other academic and public documents. Each citation is followed by a descriptive and evaluative paragraph (the annotation). The purposes of the annotation is to inform the reader (and you) of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited; it’s also there to enter into a conversation with the source and begin work the citation forward into a furtherance of the discourse at hand. You should pick ten sources, five of which should be academic in nature. Your final research paper may include more sources, so don’t think of this as a final list for your sources. In other words, you can (and should) continue to add to your source list as you progress in your research. Try to create an annotated bibliography of diverse perspectives the published sources in your topic area. Try to use this paper to assess the following: The methods of research (how research was conducted, how the source reached their conclusions); The limitations or biases of the text (mention if a source is outdated, questions about credentials, conflicts of interest, or other reasons source may be reliable, unreliable, or of limited value for purpose); Compare and contrast to other sources in bibliography (point to agreement or disagreement, or to note minor or major deviations between sources). An annotated bibliography is collection of published sources with a complete citation (the bibliography) followed by a concise summary/evaluation (the annotation). Creating an annotated bibliography calls for the application of a variety of valued writing practices: informed library research, close reading, concise exposition, and succinct analysis. Annotated source collections are great way to enter an academic conversation, and they are often shared among researchers in various fields. They serve a vital function in several areas important to research writers: namely to indicate the scope of a topic; point to the kinds of sources to be found in the topic area; demonstrate the quality of the sources found; and to prepare the way for a long research paper. The last purpose is most pertinent to this assignment, as your sources and annotations will become part of your final research paper and make you something of an expert in your chosen topic area. Our course textbook, Everyone’s an Author, describes two kinds of annotations, descriptive and evaluative annotations, and in this assignment you’ll be encouraged to use both kinds of strategies when appropriate for your topic area and research questions. Your research should include diverse perspectives. Make sure to cite your sources in MLA format, listing sources alphabetically according to your chosen citation conventions and providing an annotation for each source that includes all of the following descriptive information: Author's name, credentials, and background (briefly), name the kind of source and the main topic it addresses (report, study, website, book, podcast, blog, newspaper, museum exhibition, etc.). Include description, or summary of the source, and the conclusions most pertinent to your research questions or project goals (add a quote or paraphrase with in-text citation to make more useful—see the sample citation below). Evaluate and describe how you can/might use this source in your essay. Annotations are written in a concise, accurate, and informative manner. The style and organization of your annotated entries should be consistent, and every word and sentence should be advancing all or part of the relevant information. Be true to the source first (the bulk of the entry). Your comments or evaluations should come after summarizing the source (minimal compared to the summary) and should be written from your perspective (first person). Readers should not confuse what your source says with what you say. Use appropriate MLA documentation style and format the assignment accordingingly. Because the care and thought you put in your annotated bibliography will directly affect the quality of your research paper, you are the primary audience for this work. Also keep in mind that annotated bibliographies are often shared among researchers interested in similar topics (as are some of your classmates perhaps), so your secondary audience will appreciate adherence to format and style that produces accurate, concise, and informative entries. Think about how to write it in a useful and interesting way for your audiences and fellow enthusisasts on Tumblr. Finally, I am an important part of your audience, as the annotated bibliography will most likely be assessed for the quality of writing, sources, entries, and usefulness towards your final research project. Make sure that your annotations are thorough. Include quotes, details, claims, findings, statistics, or other meaningful passages from the source with in-text citations; this will make the annotation substantive and offer information that can be used immediately when writing your paper. Have a good mix of sources and with differing perspectives from key stakeholders in the issue. Keep in mind the wide applicability of sources that are not directly about your topic but which might offer insight into your topic area. Briefly review the items you think will provide a variety of perspectives on your topic. Read abstracts. If you do borrow language from the abstract, be sure to cite it. Scan introductions and conclusions, prefaces, table of contents and indexes, and read the library detailed record, which includes summaries of chapters, topics addressed, and keywords. 
“Annotating a Bibliography,” pp. 500-504; “Keeping Track: Managing Information Overload,” pp. 485-490; “Starting your Research,” pp. 445-454; “Finding Sources,” pp. 455-484; “Evaluating Sources,” pp. 491-499; “Synthesizing Ideas,” pp. 505-511

Opinion Series Final Draft (Unit Three / 3 opinions / 500 words each / 100 points / blogged on Tumblr then submitted on Canvas): When your draft is finished, blog it to Tumblr, and then submit the link on Canvas. At this point, you should consider the essay finished (although I don't think anything could ever be finished (just ask Walt Whitman about his Leaves of Grass)). As far as grading goes, I am looking that you have put an appropriate amount of effort into the writing, that you have implemented the concepts and practices from the in-class discussions, and that you have followed the directions outlined in the respective assignment descriptions (which you will see below)Using the topic of their proposals and annotated bibliographies as a starting place, students write a popular audience essay with the main purpose of informing readers about the various and differing perspectives on the issues they chose. While the next assignment makes a focused, cohesive argument about their own positions, the objective here is to summarize, inform, and also provide initial commentary about the competing views that have already been expressed about the topic. Students select a highly specific target audience that allows them to play with tone, stance, and style as they explain potentially controversial perspectives to an audience that likely already have preconceived notions and biases about the issues being discussed. Think pieces are generally defined as thought-provoking and speculative articles that provide background information and, sometimes, personal opinion on an issue. There are at least three immediate benefits of writing a think piece. One, they provide a lower-stakes place to do some thinking about your topic. This can be useful if you have to eventually write a more formal argument (as you’ll do in the final assignment of this course). Second, they provide excellent practice in summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting from secondary sources. Third, the popular audience allows authors to play with their writing voice and style in a manner that prepares them to rhetorically adapt their styles in various writing situations both in and beyond college. Level of formality and stance are two of the many factors that go into creating each author’s unique style, and you will have the chance to experiment with both in this assignment. Using the topic of your proposal and annotated bibliography as a starting place, write a think piece with the main purpose of informing readers about the various and differing perspectives on the issue you chose. While in your next assignment you’ll be making a focused, cohesive argument about your own position, the objective here is to summarize, inform, and also provide initial commentary about the competing views that have already been expressed about your topic. First, you need to select three of your annotated bibliography sources that seem to provide a broad range of opinions on the issue. The three sources you choose can all have significantly differing points of view, or they may have more subtle nuances of difference. The key is to make sure that all three offer something unique or different that adds to the complexity of the issue. Next, you need to pick a target audience that you could imagine reading your think piece. Your choice of audience will dictate how you approach the writing task and affect many of the choices you’ll make. Try to pick a demographic, a level of familiarity, or a degree of direct impact. For example: People roughly your same age or members of your own generation; people in an older generation and/or authorities in a position of power; people who likely know very little about the topic at the moment; people who are likely already well versed in the basics of your topic; residents of a specific geographic place; members of specific community groups or organizations impacted by the issue. Your final rhetorical choice is to choose a stance. Chapter 29 in Everyone’s an Author explains that a stance is “the attitude authors take toward their topic and audience.” Do you want to come off as a heartfelt, concerned citizen? Do you want to invite your reader into your text and make them comfortable or do you want to make them complicit in the issue’s ramifications? Do you want to inject plenty of humor (if it’s appropriate for the topic and chosen audience) or keep things more straight-forward? Any of these, and more, are possibilities. Think about the style, voice, and stance you want to write in and what’s appropriate for the topic and audience you chose. With these choices made, write a think piece that accomplishes all of the following with each of your three sources: Briefly summarize the main points of the source and highlight the key points/positions that make the source different from the other ones; paraphrase and integrate numerous quotations from each source with proper use of citation; discuss both the strengths and weaknesses and/or pros and cons of each source’s position. The last bullet is key. You’ll likely be more personally drawn to one position at this point, and that may be the position you further pursue and develop for the final assignment. However, for this assignment, you must give consideration to all sides, finding both strengths and weaknesses in all of them. Though this is a good exercise for your own developing thoughts on the issue, remember that for this paper, your primary goal is to give the audience a broad overview of the issue with a style, tone, and approach tailored to their needs. Finally, you must include a full page at the end of your essay (after the Works Cited or References), separate from your actual think piece, that justifies and explains what audience you chose to target and identifies a few ways that you made specific choices in your piece to appeal to them (think of this as a self-rhetorical analysis of your piece). Your chosen audience should be apparent based on the paper itself (and even the title), but this separate write up should make it perfectly clear. In many ways, this separate write up will be key to grading your assignment, since it will help your instructor evaluate the rhetorical appropriateness of your choices. Style and Format: Take advantage of this assignment’s opportunity to really experiment and play with your style and voice. The level of formality can be considerably lower than academic writing (as traditionally conceived), business or technical writing, or legal writing. This does not mean write poorly or dumbed down. It means: use a conversational tone, use humor when appropriate, use slang if it’s appropriate, make direct appeals to the audience, and please use “I” (because it’s rhetorically appropriate to). In other words, your style should reflect your audience and audience expectations. Audience: Remember, you’re defining the audience for this think piece. Therefore, all the writing choices you make should be in service of targeting that specific audience. Tips: Directly acknowledge audience skepticism; using generational or cultural references known to the audience you choose; reference your own experiences (to establish trust and ethos with the audience); pay attention to word choice and phrasing used by a specific audience; write a short introduction that details the general issue and explains what you’re doing in the piece (the intro is also an important place to immediately start setting your stance and style); try using headings throughout the essay, before each discussion of a new source, that quickly summarize the core of the source’s position. Textbook: “Writing Analytically,” pp. 219-220; “Quoting, Paraphrasing, Summarizing,” pp. 512-526; “What’s Your Style,” pp. 641-651; “Representing Yourself in Your Writing,” “Establishing an Appropriate Tone,” and “Connecting to Audiences,” pp. 657-661. You will take one of the six sources from your annotated bibliography and analyze the rhetorical strategies the author uses to persuade his or her audience. Summary, Critical Engagement - In response to one of your peer-reviewed scholarly texts to be used in the Proposal, 1) write an objective summary demonstrating your understanding of the content; 2) analyze/evaluate the text (argument), addressing the rhetorical context, methodology, and overall presentation; and 3) reference the text using the appropriate citation style (in-text and works cited). 4 - 5 pages.

Research Project Final Draft (Unit Four / 2000 words / 100 points / blogged on Tumblr then submitted on Canvas): When your draft is finished, blog it to Tumblr, and then submit the link on Canvas. At this point, you should consider the essay finished (although I don't think anything could ever be finished (just ask Walt Whitman about his Leaves of Grass)). As far as grading goes, I am looking that you have put an appropriate amount of effort into the writing, that you have implemented the concepts and practices from the in-class discussions, and that you have followed the directions outlined in the respective assignment descriptions (which you will see below)In this project, you will add your own voice to the ongoing conversation you have been researching by developing, arguing, and defending your position on the the controversial issue you first researched in Project #1. Following the classical argumentative structure, your essay will: 1.) introduce the problem or question at hand; 2.) unbiasedly summarize the arguments that have already been made on the issue and point out flaws or problems with those arguments; 3.) present your own argument on the issue; 4.) address potential counterarguments that may be presented to challenge your position, and either refute or concede to those counterarguments; and 5.) provide a concluding “course of action” regarding how those in your fan discourse community should use your argument to reconsider this issue within their community. Continuing with the momentum of the previous assignment(s), and incorporating your research to date, you will write a culminating research-based argument essay. As this essay is the longest in length and the most comprehensive, I will provide you with a detailed guide. 10+ sources. 10+ pages. Research History - Describe your previous experience with research, including problems and successes. How did (or didn’t) ENGL 1010 help improve your research literacy? 1 - 2 pages. Synthesis - Synthesis means making connections between the arguments of multiple authors; finding similarities, differences, noticing patterns, and observing gaps, a major step in bolstering your credibility with your designated audience, demonstrating that you are aware of different perspectives. You have 2 options for this (2 - 3 pages): Armed with the two articles discussed in class (Ferguson et al. & Anderson, et al.), seek out a third scholarly article (within the academic conversation – not necessarily a meta-analysis) and synthesize all three sources. Synthesize 3 of the scholarly sources you intend on using for the final research essay. After a semester of research and exploring multiple sides of an issue, students write a final essay that posits an arguable thesis that can be supported with the reasoned evidence of secondary sources. Students also choose a very specific audience of readers whom they wish to address in their essays. The paper should address an audience named with a proper noun and an actual address (either physical or digital). For example, students could address Mitt Romney, Engadget.com, or the FCC. Whatever the choice, students are encouraged to research this audience to understand the values and assumptions that will strengthen their arguments. In addition to the essay, students compose a companion text that repurposes the essay's argument in a different genre/medium (a poster, slideshow/presentation, pamphlet, postcard, website, video, storify essay, or any other appropriate “text”). In your proposal, you speculated on a specific issue, proposing certain knowledge, audiences, and potential claims. You then researched that issue and drew up a descriptive list of eight potential sources in your annotated bibliography. Next, in your Rhetorical Think Piece, you analyzed the discourse according to the three main perspectives that surrounded your controversial issue. Now, it is time for you to give your own perspective. For this paper, you will posit a claim coupled with well-developed reasons. You will use as much of your evidence as you need in order to effectively prove your argument to the intended audience. Choose a very specific audience; readers whom you wish to address in your essay. Keep away from vague, generic audiences like “today’s culture or society” or “Americans.” Instead, your paper should address an audience named with a proper noun and an actual address (either physical or digital). For example, you could address Mitt Romney, Engadget.com, or the FCC. Whatever your choice, you want to make sure that you do a little research on this audience to understand the values and assumptions that will strengthen your argument. Your audience will want to know about the discourse that is taking place and how you might be advancing it. Give a brief description of the conversation that is taking place and how your argument fits in but also carries on the conversation. Not only will you need to make a clear claim, but your audience will expect you to have several well- developed reasons why you want to make this claim. Remember, you should draw extensively from your annotated bibliography sources to provide support for your reasons and claim. Somewhere in your essay, you may also need to address a counterargument (or naysayer). If that is the case, and likely it is, make sure that you do the following: Name and describe your opponent(s); describe your opponent’s position fairly and accurately; make any necessary concessions, that is, identify any common ground you might share; respond with a well-considered and reasonable rebuttal Companion Piece. In addition to your paper, you will need to compose a companion text that repurposes the argument of your essay in a different genre/medium. For example, you can create a poster, slideshow/presentation, pamphlet, postcard, website, tumblr, storify essay, or any other appropriate “text.” Style and Format: You will want to organize your paper according to the type of argument you are making. Take a look at Chapters 11 and 17-18 in Everyone’s an Author to determine what type of claim you’re proposing and to get an idea as to how best arrange your argument and provide the correct support. Depending on your audience, you will want to determine how formal you will want to be in your writing. In other words, in reading your paper, it should be obvious that you’re writing to the audience you’ve identified. Textbook: “Arguing a Position,” pp. 116-158; “Analyzing and Constructing Arguments,” pp. 379-418; “Strategies for Supporting an Argument,” pp. 419-444; “Synthesizing Ideas: Moving from What Your Sources Say to What You Say,” pp. 505-511; “Quoting, Paraphrasing, Summarizing,” pp. 512-526; “Giving Credit, Avoiding Plagiarism,” pp. 527-534

Portfolio Epilogue Final Draft (Unit Five / 1000 words / 100 points / blogged on Tumblr then submitted on Canvas): When your draft is finished, blog it to Tumblr, and then submit the link on Canvas. At this point, you should consider the essay finished (although I don't think anything could ever be finished (just ask Walt Whitman about his Leaves of Grass)). As far as grading goes, I am looking that you have put an appropriate amount of effort into the writing, that you have implemented the concepts and practices from the in-class discussions, and that you have followed the directions outlined in the respective assignment descriptions (which you will see below)A writing portfolio is an end of the semester collection that demonstrates student accomplishments in the course. It includes copies of final assignments, rough drafts and comments from peers and instructors, and a portfolio statement that reflects on the writing process throughout the semester. In addition to assessing strengths and weaknesses as a writer, this statement also address students' future goals as writers. The Reflection Essay similarly asks students to reflect upon their work throughout the semester. However, the longer length requirements gives room for a deeper exploration of reflections around such issues as: curiosity, openness, engagement, persistence, and responsibility. At the end of the writing process, it’s always beneficial to reflect over what you’ve written and the process that allowed you complete each task. This semester, you were asked to analyze and write in a variety of genres. You also learned useful rhetorical skills that you can employ in your writing in other college classes. This short essay, or reflection letter, is an opportunity to recall your triumphs and struggles, your writing process and finished projects, and your overall learning gains in the course. Reflecting on what you’ve accomplished can help you retain the lessons you’ve learned and prepare the way for improvement in your future writing projects. While you may have reflected on your writing process in English 1010, this assignment asks that you reflect on your experience as an English 2010 student. So, you may want to consider more carefully and critically why writing matters to you as a university student. Too, you may want to address your future goals as a writer, one who will not be required to take any more writing intensive courses. How will you continue to practice the art of rhetoric? How will you continue to develop your writing skills? So, once again, this assignment will be one document split into two parts (invention and a reflective letter). First, Invention: Begin thinking about the writing process by completing the following statements with at least two additional explanatory sentences: “I believe writing is...”; “I believe revising is...”; “I feel that writing courses are...” Second: Reflective Letter: Write a short letter to your classmates and instructor about your writing progression this year. Use the following outline and questions to guide your thinking and writing; however, you do not need to include answers to every questions below. Curiosity: How and in what way has this class been beneficial in creating a desire for you to learn more about your world? Did you learn about yourself through your writing and where you fit within a certain discussion? Why or why not—and if so, what did you learn? Did a specific assignment aid in this change? Openness: How and in what way has this class asked you to consider new ways of thinking about a subject and your place in the world? Have you changed your mind about something discussed in class this semester or in your writing? Explain why or why not. Did a specific assignment aid in this change? Engagement: To what degree did you feel invested in your writing this semester? In other words, was there ever a time where you felt like you were writing, not simply to get a good grade, but to express your opinion about a subject? Was there a specific assignment that you felt allowed you to do this? Persistence: How and in what way has this class challenged your writing habits? Did you spend more time writing or revising this semester? Which one (writing or revising) was more difficult for you? Why? Did one specific writing assignment challenge your writing process more than others? If so, please explain how and why. Responsibility: How and in what way has this class allowed you to take charge of your ideas as a writer? Do you feel your writing can or should have an impact on your social environment? Why or why not? How might you use your writing in future classes or in your daily life? Style and Format: Since this is a personal essay that asks you to reflect on your own work, your style may be quite informal. However, you do want to make sure that your audience understands your answers to all required parts of the assignment; use the outline above to answer important questions about your learning process. Audience: Your main audience for this assignment will be your instructor and fellow classmates. Because it is a reflective genre, you, the author, may be the most important audience, as choosing your best work and assessing your own writing is a critical practice that helps to solidify learning gains. As it turns out, for this assignment you and your instructor share similar audience needs: you want to write an honest and penetrating exploration of your composing process and products, while having a compelling story of specific gains earned through your struggles and victories—pretty much what your instructor wants to read. Tips:Remember that the statement is yet another opportunity to showcase your writing ability for your instructor, so do it care and thoroughness; map out your progress in the course visually. Which elements seem to dominate your visual representation?; list the comments from peers and the instructor that you see. Are there suggestions that came up more frequently? What did you do to improve on the skill being mentioned?; enjoy the process! Remember that your reflection is meant to help you see how you’ve improved as a writer and critical thinker. Textbook: “Reflecting on your Writing,” p. 796. Your final writing reflection essay should include a few things: first, your Tumblr username; second, a 500 word reflection; third, the title of your best essay; and, fourth, the titles of your five best Tumblr blogs. I will grade your entire Tumblr account, so you should add all the writings you want me to see there on your Tumblr account, and you should format and design them to be in tip-top shape. We will discuss document design principles during this section. Those lessons should assist you in preparing your final portfolio. Reviewing and designing your pieces will also give you an opportunity to review your work and thus what you have learned throughout the semester. The reflection you write should be concerned with reviewing your writing process throughout the semester. In addition to assessing your strengths and weaknesses as a writer, your statement should also address your future goals as a writer. Additionally, the reflection letter or essay, is an opportunity to recall your triumphs and struggles, your writing process and finished projects, and your overall learning gains in the course. Reflecting on what you’ve accomplished can help you retain the lessons you’ve learned and prepare the way for improvement in your future writing projects. Consider using the prompts on page 796 in Everyone’s an Author, which suggest reviewing your work for strengths and weaknesses; analyzing your writing process and strategies; reflecting on your work as an author; and defining future writing goals and plans for improvement. You should think of this as a persuasive task, telling readers what you’ve learned. Using your Tumblr essays, blogs, and comments as supportive evidence, explain what your work says about you as a student and writer? Help me understand why you included the materials you did and what this says about your work in this course. So, for example, if you claim to have improved your organization, you can point to your improved paragraphs, transitions, or how you moved sections around to increase clarity or remove redundancies. Mostly, it is an evaluation of what you have learned about writing, what you have accomplished in the semester, and about your ability to set your own writing goals and assess your own written work. Consider me, your instructor, as the audience of this piece. You can structure it like a letter, in which case I don’t want you to blog this to Tumblr; just submit it on Canvas. These letters help me know what I can do better and/or change in courses in the future. Because it is a reflective genre, you, the author, may be the most important audience for the portfolio, as choosing your best work and assessing your own writing is a critical practice that helps to solidify learning gains. As it turns out, for this assignment you and your instructor share similar audience needs: you want to write an honest and penetrating exploration of your composing process and products, while having a compelling story of specific gains earned through your struggles and victories. Remember that the statement is yet another opportunity to showcase your writing ability for your instructor, so do it with care and thoroughness. For more reading on this look at “Assembling a Portfolio” on pages 793-801 in our textbook. (next semester make this a letter to your past self (your me-as-a-writer-before-this-class self)). A writing portfolio is an end of the semester collection that demonstrates your accomplishments in the course. It includes copies of final assignments, rough drafts and comments from peers and instructors, and a portfolio statement that reflects on your writing process throughout the semester. In addition to assessing your strengths and weaknesses as a writer, your statement should also address your future goals as a writer. Additionally, the portfolio statement, or reflection letter or essay, is an opportunity to recall your triumphs and struggles, your writing process and finished projects, and your overall learning gains in the course. Reflecting on what you’ve accomplished can help you retain the lessons you’ve learned and prepare the way for improvement in your future writing projects. Compile and submit a portfolio that includes the following: Your best essays and other projects (usually 2 or 3 formal assignments, along with the final revised Researched Argument Essay being mandatory); rough drafts and peer and instructor reviews tracing your progress for each assignment; evidence of your writing as a process (including freewriting, brainstorming notes, in-class work, group work, Canvas discussion posts, etc.); portfolio Statement: Use the prompts on page 796 in Everyone’s an Author that ask you to review your work for strengths and weaknesses; analyze your writing process and strategies; reflect on your work as an author, and to define future writing goals and plans for improvement. Style and Format of Portfolio Statement: Whether in a letter or essay genre, paper or electronic delivery, you should think of this as a persuasive task, telling readers what you’ve learned. Using your portfolio materials as supportive evidence, explain what your work says about you as a student and writer? Help your instructor understand why you included the materials you did and what this says about your work in this course. So, for example, if you claim to have improved your organization, you can point to your improved paragraphs, transitions, or how you moved sections around to increase clarity or remove redundancies. When addressing multi-modal projects, the same principles apply: Describe what you did to improve the project over time, include early versions (give links if stored on the web or provide PDF copies), and use evidence from your collected works as support in your portfolio statement. Suggested Organizational Format: Begin with a cover page that includes a title, your name, course, instructor, and date; next, include the Portfolio Statement/Reflection essay; the proceeding sections should follow in the order they are addressed in your portfolio statement (so if you begin with the Rhetorical Analysis, put it first, followed by the next item addressed in the statement); clean copies of final drafts of formal assignments should on top and then followed by rough drafts, peer reviews, instructor comments, notes, or other related work to the assignment (in the order addressed); keep in mind that this is not an evaluation of the class or instructor (you’ll get a chance to do this in the course evaluations); rather, it is an evaluation of what you have learned about writing, what you have accomplished in the semester, and about your ability to set your own writing goals and assess your own written work. Audience: As a capstone project for the course, the portfolio will be read with great interest by your instructor to assess and grade, and may even be used to measure how effectively the course objectives have been achieved. Because it is a reflective genre, you, the author, may be the most important audience for the portfolio, as choosing your best work and assessing your own writing is a critical practice that helps to solidify learning gains. As it turns out, for this assignment you and your instructor share similar audience needs: You want to write an honest and penetrating exploration of your composing process and products, while having a compelling story of specific gains earned through your struggles and victories—pretty much what your instructor wants to read. Tips: Remember that the statement is yet another opportunity to showcase your writing ability for your instructor, so do it care and thoroughness; map out your progress in the course visually. Which elements seem to dominate your visual representation?; list the comments from peers and the instructor that you see. Are there suggestions that came up more frequently? What did you do to improve on the skill being mentioned?; enjoy the process! Remember that the portfolio is meant to help you see how you’ve improved as a writer and critical thinker; consider that English 2010 is the last required writing course at the university. How will you continue to improve your writing and communication skills at Utah Valley University? What does this course mean to you, knowing you’ll not be given an opportunity to focus on research and writing skills in such a capacity again? Textbook: “Assembling a Portfolio,” pp. 793-801

 
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Schedule: The Schedule is rather simple: you have reading and responding assignments due before class each day, and you have a sequence of topics and subjects that will help you work toward completing the essay assignments. Also, as time continues to amalgamate, and I continue to enable its amalgamation by continually writing (adding to this syllabus), I am realizing that there is no way we will be able to talk about all the things that I would like to talk to you about; at which point I lose all hopelessness and faithfully attempt to teach you what I can. Having said this, I want to assure you that the best way for these days to proceed is by your participation, for I cannot perceive what you do and do not know, which is why I want you to let me know, so I can tailor the lessons according to your needs. If you (and I mean all of you) do not let me know what those needs are, then I will have to do that thing we humans have come to call “assuming,” and I really hate doing that (although I understand that life is just one large assumption, and I don’t want to infer that I hate life, I just prefer, when it comes to other disoriented humans, knowing what your particular disorientation is, so I can attempt to orient or oxident my fellows).

day one / august 19 / intro to class /
due / book purchased / syllabus read /
class / freewrite / introduce people / discuss syllabus / explain platforms / where are you now with writing? / what are your desires for writing / what do you hate about writing? / what are your fears with writing and this class? / the importance of a spirit of inquiry / what is your question to life? / writing as inevitably subjective / writing as expression / breaking the rules of writing / what is a "perfect" paper / can you write a paper to everyone / is there a completely "wrong" paper / is there a perfect way to read a paper / is there a wrong way to read a paper / are there wrong or perfect styles / are there perfect or wrong rules in writing / 

day two / august 21 / intro to writing /
due / everybody's an author introduction read / structure, sign and play by jacque derrida first three pages read / tumblr account created / tumblr blog written (1) / tumblr reblog written (1) / best thing you've ever written blogged on tumblr and then submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / language and literacy / what exactly is language or what isn't language / are you literate? / IRL vs. AFK / language as representative / language as sign / ideal vs. real / the death of the author / idea spectrum from abstract to specific / ideas as metaphysical / language as access / eidolon and image / all words are images / literacy and phenomenology / hermeneutics and the complications of interpretations / can you undo your literacy / literacy is not knowing all the words, its knowing how to know all the words / what is reading if there is no understanding, and what is understanding / witches curse by tom friedman / uncreative writing (shakespeare) by kenneth goldsmith /

day three / august 26 / project proposal / inventio
due / everyone's an author chapter 16 read /  tumblr blog written (2) / tumblr reblog written (2) / topics section from syllabus read / project proposal assignment description read /
class / freewrite / introduce project proposal assignment / perform a project proposal / discuss: how do you understand the project proposal assignment / research / identify purpose of research / the role of research and the role of the researcher / the nature and purpose of research / the history of research / rationale for your research project / writerly and readerly roles / what’s at stake for this idea / what ideas need to be uncovered, recovered or discovered / why does this idea exist / why are others interested in this idea / squirrel problem by zachary schomburg /

day four / august 28 / project proposal / inventio
due / everybody's an author chapter 19 read / tumblr blog written (3) / tumblr reblog written (3) / freewrite draft assignment description read / project proposal freewrite draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / discuss: what are you plans for the project proposal / reading / finding something to read / selecting an object of study / the role of critical reading / reading / discovering a passion / fostering a passion / finding enthusiasm / finding fecundity / ideas with possibility / ideas you can believe in / ideas you feel are important / what makes something worthwhile / how do you develop a poet’s passion / how to obsess over a topic. how to become the biologist who obsesses over the bacteria at the base of his grandmother’s plum tree / discovery of rhetorical practices / jacques derrida described inventio as the "invention of the other" / obsession / song of myself by walt whitman /

no class / september 2

day five / september 4 / project proposal / inventio
due / everybody's an author chapter 1 read / tumblr blog written (4) / tumblr reblog written (4) / rough draft assignment description read / project proposal rough draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / / topoi / focusing your topic / how do you narrow a topic / how do you broaden a topic / common places (places = topoi in Greek) / "topics of invention." / definition / division / comparison / relationship / circumstances / testimony / notation and conjugates / judicial / deliberative / ceremonial / imitation / etc.

day six / september 9 / project proposal / inventio
due /  everyone's an author chapter 2 read / tumblr blog written (5) / tumblr reblog written (5) / formal draft assignment description read / project proposal formal draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / workshop / stasis / developing confidence in an idea / social, cultural, artistic, political, moral, economic, religious, or philosophical significance / develop research questions / asking a question / methods of inquiry / reading as inquiry / how do you develop an academic discipline toward a subject / why spend time on this project / developing research questions / asking the right questions

day seven / september 11 / project proposal / inventio
due / everyone's an author chapter 13 read / tumblr blog written (6) / tumblr reblog written (6) / final draft assignment description read / project proposal final draft blogged on tumblr and submitted on canvas
class / freewrite / inventio / reflection on project proposal / developing an argument / collect data and sources / inventio / invention / brainstorm for material / finding something to say / the role of critical writing / the role of the critic role 

day eight / september 16 / annotated bibliography / dispositio
due / everyone's an author chapter 20 read / tumblr blog written (7) / tumblr reblog written (7) / annotated bibliography assignment description read /  
class / freewrite / introduce annotated bibliography assignment / perform an annotated bibliography / discuss: how do you understand the annotated bibliography assignment / …

day nine / september 18 / annotated bibliography / dispositio
due / everyone's an author chapter 21 read / tumblr blog written (8) / tumblr reblog written (8) / annotated bibliography freewrite draft submitted on canvas /  
class / freewrite / discuss: what are you plans for the annotated bibliography /

day ten / september 23 / annotated bibliography / dispositio
due / everybody's an author chapter 22 read / tumblr blog written (9) / tumblr reblog written (9) / annotated bibliography rough draft submitted on canvas 
class / freewrite / …

day eleven / september 25 / annotated bibliography / dispositio
due / everybody's an author chapter 23 read / tumblr blog written (10) / tumblr reblog written (10) / annotated bibliography formal draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / workshop /

day twelve / september 30 / annotated bibliography / dispositio
due / everybody's an author chapter 14 read / tumblr blog written (11) / tumblr reblog written (11) / annotated bibliography final draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / reflection on annotated bibliography / …

day thirteen / october 2 / opinion series / elocutio
due / everybody's an author chapter 24 read / tumblr blog written (12) / tumblr reblog written (12) / opinion series assignment description read /
class / freewrite / introduce opinion series assignment / perform an opinion series / discuss: how do you understand the opinion series assignment / …

day fourteen / october 7 / opinion series / elocutio
due / everybody's an author chapter 25 read / tumblr blog written (13) / tumblr reblog written (13) / opinion series freewrite draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / discuss: what are you plans for the opinion series /

day fifteen / october 9 / opinion series / elocutio
due / everybody's an author chapter 2 read / tumblr blog written (14) / tumblr reblog written (14) / opinion series rough draft submitted on canvas /
class /  freewrite / …

day sixteen / october 14 / opinion series / elocutio
due / everybody's an author chapter 11 read / tumblr blog written (15) / tumblr reblog written (15) / opinion series formal draft submitted on canvas /
class /  freewrite / workshop /

day seventeen / october 16 / opinion series / elocutio
due / everybody’s an author chapter 12 read / tumblr blog written (16) / tumblr reblog written (16) / opinion series final draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / reflection on opinion series / …

day eighteen / october 21 / research project / memoria
due / everybody’s an author chapter 17 read / tumblr blog written (17) / tumblr reblog written (17) / research project assignment description read /
class / freewrite / introduce research project assignment / perform a research project / discuss: how do you understand the research project assignment

day nineteen / october 23 / research project / memoria
due / everybody's an author chapter 4 read / tumblr blog written (18) / tumblr reblog written (18) / research project freewrite draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / discuss: what are you plans for the research project /

day twenty / october 28 / research project / memoria
due / everybody's an author chapter 29 read / tumblr blog written (19) / tumblr reblog written (19) / research project rough draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / …

day twenty-one / october 30 / research project / memoria
due / everybody's an author chapter 31 read / tumblr blog written (20) / tumblr reblog written (20) / research project formal draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / workshop /

day twenty-two / november 4 / research project / memoria
due / everybody's an author chapter 32 read / tumblr blog written (21) / tumblr reblog written (21) / research project final draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / reflection on research project / …

day twenty-three / november 6 / portfolio epilogue / pronuntiatio
due / everybody's an author chapter 33 read / tumblr blog written (22) / tumblr reblog written (22) / portfolio epilogue assignment description read /
class / freewrite / introduce portfolio epilogue assignment / perform a portfolio epilogue / discuss: how do you understand the portfolio epilogue assignment

day twenty-four / november 11 /  portfolio epilogue / pronuntiatio
due / everybody's an author chapter 34 read / tumblr blog written (23) / tumblr reblog written (23) / portfolio epilogue freewrite draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / discuss: what are you plans for the portfolio epilogue /

day twenty-five / november 13 / portfolio epilogue / pronuntiatio
due / everybody's an author chapter 35 read / tumblr blog written (24) / tumblr reblog written (24) / portfolio epilogue rough draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / …

day twenty-six / november 18 / portfolio epilogue / pronuntiatio
due / everybody's an author chapter 36 read / tumblr blog written (25) / tumblr reblog written (25) / portfolio epilogue formal draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / workshop /

day twenty-seven / november 20 / portfolio epilogue / pronuntiatio
due / everybody's an author chapter 37 read / portfolio epilogue final draft submitted on canvas /
class / freewrite / reflection on portfolio epilogue / …

no class / november 25

no class / november 27

day twenty-eight / december 2 / reflection /
due / everybody's an author chapter … read / …
class / freewrite / workshop /

day twenty-nine / december 4 / final day /
due / everybody's an author chapter … read / everything, everything is due this day / …
class / freewrite / …

 
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Plagiarism: Plagiarism may be intentional or unintentional. Unintentional plagiarism, or incidental use of another's ideas or words without proper attribution, arises from a lack of understanding of the rules of citation and quotation. One commits intentional plagiarism (academic fraud) when one does any one of the following:

  1. represents as one's own the work or knowledge of another person, regardless of the form in which that work or knowledge had originally appeared (e.g. in the form of a book, article, essay, lecture, web site, speech, photograph, chart, graphic, or any other form)

  2. incorporates into one's work the words or ideas of another person without clear attribution that appears at the point the words or ideas have been incorporated, to an extent substantial enough that the origin of the words or ideas has been misrepresented

  3. fails to acknowledge clearly the partial or full authorship of someone else when submitting work

  4. consistently fails to cite or quote textual resources properly, despite the instructor's attempts at educational intervention.

A person who knowingly allows his or her work to be copied, or submitted by another student as course work without the work's proper authorship clearly identified, is an accomplice to plagiarism, and the sanctions outlined below, as relevant, will be applied to this person as well. If evidence shows that intentional plagiarism, as defined above, has occurred, the following sanctions shall be imposed: 

  1. The academic work shall receive a failing grade

  2. The student will fail the course, or may elect to drop the course if the last day to drop a course has not yet passed, provided that the instructor's syllabus for the course conveys that intentional plagiarism will result in a failing course grade

  3. A written summary of the infraction of this policy, with copies of the relevant evidence, shall be submitted to the Office of the Dean of Student Services to document a violation of the Student Code of Utah Valley University, as outlined in "Student Rights and Responsibilities". This documentation shall also be provided to the student, and constitutes both a warning and a reprimand to the student as described in Section M, "Sanctions," of "Student Rights and Responsibilities" (Article IV, Section M in the print version).

For more information and tips on avoiding plagiarism, please visit: http://www.uvu.edu/english/student-resources/policies-procedures.html

Statement of Accessibility: If you have any disability which may impair your ability to successfully complete this course, please contact the Accessibility Services Department (LC 312; 863-8747; www.uvu.edu/asd/). Academic Accommodations are granted for all students who have qualified, documented disabilities. Services are coordinated with the student and instructor by the Accessibility Services Department. Students who need accommodations because of a disability may contact the UVU Accessibility Services Department (ASD), located on the Orem Campus in LC 312. To schedule an appointment or to speak with a counselor, call the ASD office at 801-863-8747. Deaf/Hard of Hearing individuals, email nicole.hemmingsen@uvu.edu or text 385-208-2677.

Waitlist and Add Policy: It is against the policy of Utah Valley University for students who are not registered and enrolled in a class to attend it. Students who are on a class waitlist, even if they are the first on the list, are not enrolled. There is absolutely no guarantee any students on the waitlist will be enrolled. Students on a waitlist must wait for an email notifications that allow registration and enrollment in the course. All adds and enrollments into a course off a waitlist are through the online system. Instructors cannot add students. Department administrative staff and academic advisors cannot add students.

Writing Lab: www.uvu.edu/writingcenter
The UVU Writing Center provides a space where students of all disciplines may further their understanding of writing principles and enhance their writing skills. This is primarily achieved through one-on-one tutorials focused on specific writing assignments and tailored to the individual student's needs.

First Year Experience Information: www.uvu.edu/firstyear

Multicultural Student Services: http://www.uvu.edu/multicultural

LGTBQ Student Services: http://www.uvu.edu/multicultural/lgbt

Veteran’s Center: https://www.uvu.edu/veterans/

Disclaimer: This syllabus is subject to change.